How Do Chef Schools Work?

Culinary schools give aspiring chefs their best shot at making it to the big time, especially those admitted by the American Culinary Federation. Just like any other profession, many of the better hospitality establishments base their hiring practices not only upon the length of education the applicant provides, but also where that education was obtained. Tuition runs the gamut from relatively inexpensive courses offered by local community colleges all the way to the Culinary Institute of America's breathtaking $ 40,000 price tag. And what does not tuition cover? Oh, just uniforms, textbooks, cutlery, and other necessary kitchen equipment.

Curriculum different from school to school, but most of the culinary student's time is consumed in learning the ins and outs of cooking by actually doing it under close supervision. Participants not only prepare food, but also learn how to plan menus, minimize food costs, buy food and supplies in quantities, and how to appropriately choose and store food. Learning proper hygiene and local public health rules also play a large part in a culinary student's education.

Classes are sometimes offered all day, taking a complete eight hours, while at some schools, classes are broken into morning and afternoon sessions. There are usually lectures, and then demonstrations followed by hands-on practice time with students applying the techniques demonstrated earlier. Some schools even offer part-time professional classes to accomodate working cooks wanting to increase their formal education.

A number of educational seminars are available, among them:

The American Academy of Chefs Chair's Scholarship – Ten $ 1,000 scholarships awarded each year

The American Academy of Chefs Chaine des Rotisseurs Scholarship – Twenty $ 1,000 scholarships awarded annually

National Restaurant Association Educational Foundation (NRAEF) – Three annual $ 2,000 scholarships for high school seniors and undergraduate students

Because years of training and experience are needed to reach the level of executive chef in most well-paying restaurants, many students are serious about this profession beginning their training in high school through voluntary programs, then go on to a two- or four-year college or university. Apprenticeship programs offer more training afterward, and these come from individual eating establishments and are given by a personal mentor or from professional institutions and associations such as the American Culinary Federation.

Apprenticeship lasts usually about three years and is most often known as the years of "grunt work" – doing all the chopping, grating, peeling, slicing, and washing necessary to prepare the ingredients for the chefs. Even cleaning appliances, sweeping and mopping floors, and other seemingly unaffiliated "chef" work gets done by the apprentice as part of his or her learning experience. Often this "trial-by-fire" period separates the truly devoted cafés-to-be from those who are merely good cooks.

It is not impossible to attain the status of executive chef without the benefit of formal education, but in today's job market, most establishments (especially the finer hotels and restaurants) now require some type of certification to work in this capacity. Like a degree of any sort, formal training in the culinary arts may not mean you are another Julia Child or Paul Prudhomme, but it does at least signify that you've got what it takes to get through the school. So stop trying to think of ways to take shortcuts, get your tuition together, and go learn what you need to attain your dream!

Food and Tea in China

Chinese food is a very popular type of food among American's and has become a favorite to many. With this in mind, many people consider going to China to experience the food directly from China. The food alone in China makes China a top travel destination. However, it is to be of no surprise that the Chinese food in China is very different from the Americanized Chinese food available within the United States.

The quality of rice available in China is much different than anywhere else across the globe. China has an abundance of rice fields, making rice readily available within the country. Rice is one of the main dishes in any Chinese meal.

There are several different locations in China to visit for various dishes you might like to try. Beijing is well-known for their Peking duck. However, Shanghai is famous for their pork buns. It is all dependent on what it is you are looking for as to what area of ​​China you would be pleased the most within your travels abroad to China.

However, some food customs in China are very different than anywhere an American traveler would be used to. In most parts of China, soups are served after the meal. However, the Cantonese do serve soup before the meal.

Aside from the Chinese food us Americans have grown to love China for, China is also famous for their tea. They are most famous for their jasmine and green tea. So, while in China, do not pass up the opportunity to taste their tea.

Uses And Features Of Price Computing Scales

Price computing scales design all those scales that are normally available with an LCD display, but have an additional capability of converting units to price. As is evident for this description, price computing scales are useful for weighing by traders: fruits, vegetables, and other grocery items; meat and butcher shops; bakery items like cake and biscuits, ice cream sellers, hardware etc. A trader just needs to feed in the price per unit rate as many times as the market changes. Each time he will get readings for different items with their price. For the convenience of the customers Dual display LCD screens are also available with one in front for the counter attendant and the other at the back for the customer to see. Since most price computing scales are used in trade they are considered legal, if they have been approved by NTEP or any other regulatory body in your area.

The types of price computing scales vary according to features; you may be looking for 15 lb, 30 lb, or 60 lb. Capacity which can be calculated by one scale for fruits and vegetable weighing. Small sizes that save space and have a battery powered operation facilitating portability are also in demand as fruit sellers on carts or vendors need to move it from time to time. Deli shops, meat shops, candy counters or cheese shops with limited counter space may find compact design very useful.

Price computing scales is most desirable for the cost conscious retailer who wants to be honest in his dealings, since precision in weight reading and accuracy in price conversion is a matter of integrity for them. Electronic load cells with a digital display make sure that these shop owners are satisfied. Out of all scales available in the market the better ones are easy to install and operate with easy cleaning and minimum maintenance requirements. The more attractive ones have a rugged housing, sleek profile and small footprint with some additional features like

1. Raised keys with a key beeper

2. Battery operated with auto sleep and shut off options for power saving

3. High resolution to weigh small objects and give increments like 0.01 lb or 0.005 lb divisions

4. High grade polymer surface with stainless steel pan

5. Price computing function by count (number) of objects

6. Large memory storage up to 25 PLU's

7. Price accumulation at the end of grocery purchase by one customer.

8. Tare function to enable reset of display to zero after adding object each time to a loaded pan.

9. LCD displays with large numbers and back lit displays

Price computing scales like all others need to be bought with platform size and capacity in mind according to the type, size and weight of object you plan to put in it. Minimum and maximum weight requirements must be kept in mind to allow for your full range of products to be weighed by one scale. Finally accuracy in reading and durability of scales for use in harsh environments are factors that should drive the purchase decision.

Productivity Measurements and Telecommuting

Over the years, the improved channels of telecommunication have paved the way for an increase in number of Telecommuting jobs. Telecommuting occupations are not your typical office work and that is why, it has become a focus of productivity measures issues. There are a lot of myths that surround telecommuting and Productivity Measurements. Some say that measuring productivity is much more difficult in telecommuting than in regular office work.

Before going forward, let us first individually define what Productivity and what Telecommuting is. Productivity (in Economics) refers to the amount of output produced in a specific amount of time. In a factory or office setting, this can easily be computed by dividing the number of units of output with the time spent to produce them. For example, an office worker is given the task to compile kits for the participants of a lecture. He was able to compile 25 kits in 1 hour, and that becomes his productivity rate.

Quantitative data is more easily translated into productivity rates rather than qualitative data. On the other hand Telecommuting (other known as working from home) is form of work where the employee works on his or her own schedule. It is called telecommuting because the time and process of commuting to and from the work place are replaced by links of telecommunication. A few of the most popular telecommuting tasks is Medical Transcription and Insurance Underwriting.

The issue that lies between Productivity measurement and Telecommuting are claims saying that Productivity measurement is harder to achieve than with regular office work. This is claimed to be the major downfall of telecommuting. Because of this, employer supposedly has no hold on the productivity of their personnel who work form home.

However, that is really not the case. Productivity Measurements are still easily achievable with Telecommuting Jobs. The rate telecommuting employee works, is the same with every project that he / she receives. A Medical Transcriptionist may complete transcription of 5 files in an hour. No matter how many hours a day a medical transcriptionist chooses to work, his or her hourly rate is still the same.

Another myth about productivity measurement and telecommuting is that an employee has no hold on how much an employee works on a set number of days. This is opposed by the fact that employers enforce deadlines that a Telecommuting employee must adhere to. In example, an Underwriter is given 10 insurance policies to process in a span of 4 days. It is of no consequence to the employer how his or her Underwriter divides the task over 4 days as long as it is completed within the set number of days.

Telecommuting is a practice that will unduly continue to grow. Since early fears that it may not be a as easy to regulate and measure as regular office work, it has been proven that it is not so. That is the reason why employers should not shy away from hiring telecommuting personnel because they can still measure and regulate their productivity rate since not having set office hours.